EMT used for chinning bar

I tried to call attention to this situation while visiting a well-known drug store in a major city on more than one occasion, and was told to mind my own business. I captured this image while I was standing in the aisle near the storage space where the store's service equipment was located. This EMT was not properly secured to the coupling. It was clear to me that the only way that the conduit was

I tried to call attention to this situation while visiting a well-known drug store in a major city on more than one occasion, and was told to mind my own business. I captured this image while I was standing in the aisle near the storage space where the store's service equipment was located. This EMT was not properly secured to the “two-screw” coupling. It was clear to me that the only way that the conduit was bent this way was because someone used the raceway as a chinning bar. Nevertheless, electrical continuity is not present, and can lead to an electrical shock hazard or other overcurrent situation. Article 100 defines overcurrent as “any current in excess of the rated current of equipment or the ampacity of a conductor. It may result from overload, short circuit or ground fault.”

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