NSA October 2017 Unemployment Rate

Hurricane Recovery Helps Construction Unemployment Rate Hit Lowest October Mark on Record

Construction unemployment rates were also down in 44 states on a year-over-year basis, unchanged in one, and up in five states.

The not seasonally adjusted (NSA) national construction unemployment rate was 4.5% in October, down 1.2% from a year ago, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). It was the lowest October rate on record, matching the rate in 2006, according to analysis released by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). In addition, the construction industry employed 180,000 more workers than in October 2016.

Construction unemployment rates were also down in 44 states on a year-over-year basis, unchanged in one (South Dakota) and up in five states.

“Recovery from the various hurricanes that hit the United States appeared to be a major factor in October construction employment. Some northern states that would normally have an increase in their NSA construction unemployment rate had flat or down rates. This is likely due to some construction workers leaving those states to help with hurricane recovery,” said Bernard M. Markstein, Ph.D., president and chief economist of Markstein Advisors, who conducted the analysis for ABC. “The need for construction workers as part of recovery and rebuilding efforts after this year’s devastating hurricanes, floods and wildfires is providing employment for workers who normally would be subject to seasonal layoffs.”

The states with the lowest estimated October NSA construction unemployment rates in order from lowest to highest were:

1. Hawaii, 2%

2. Idaho, 2.3%

3. Colorado, 2.5%

4. Vermont, 2.7%

5. Iowa, 2.8%

The states with the highest October NSA construction unemployment rates in order from lowest to highest were:

46. Pennsylvania, 6.4%

47. New Jersey, 6.5%

48. Illinois, 7.1%

49. New Mexico, 8.4%

50. Alaska, 15%

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