Computer Vision Syndrome

Eyestrain, blurred vision, headaches, and tense muscles are universal complaints among employees who work long hours in front of computer screens. Currently, computer-related vision and eye problems, known as Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) have reached crisis proportions in the workplace. Adding to the problem is ineffective lighting. Typically, good light distribution is not accomplished in standard


Eyestrain, blurred vision, headaches, and tense muscles are universal complaints among employees who work long hours in front of computer screens. Currently, computer-related vision and eye problems, known as Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) have reached crisis proportions in the workplace. Adding to the problem is ineffective lighting. Typically, good light distribution is not accomplished in standard office settings because the constant, bright lighting and glare from overhead fluorescent lighting produces washout, veiling reflections, and an uncomfortable brightness ratio. Parabolic fixtures that direct fluorescent light downward over a workstation, indirect lighting techniques that focus lighting upward, and screen filters help reduce the symptoms of CVS. However, one of the most effective remedies is to give computer users individual control of their own overhead fluorescent lighting. This is now possible with a handheld remote control. The employee adjusts the fluorescent lighting to his or her personal comfort level for various tasks at different times of the day. For more information on the individual fluorescent lighting control, call the Lutron Hotline at (800) 523-9466 or visit www.lutron.com.

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