Structures Supplied by Other Than a Service, Part 8

When using a branch or feeder from one building to supply power to another, know the rule on occupant access to the supply disconnects. 

If you use a branch or feeder from one building to supply power to another, what's the rule on occupant access to the supply disconnects? If it's a multiple occupancy building, each occupant must have access to that occupant's supply disconnecting means [225.35].

A common example of this is a multi-building strip mall in which each building is sectioned off for individual shops. One building has the electric utility service, and each of the others is fed by a feeder from that building. Over in building three, the hair salon, card shop, chiropractor, and hobby shop are each served by individual disconnects.

You don't see this arrangement in single-tenant/owner industrial facilities, because it's the same occupant for all of the buildings. But you might see it in an industrial park or office park, if the individual occupancies have a low enough electrical demand to share a service. In essence, they are really strip malls used for a purpose other than retail.

For all situations in which a structure is supplied by other than a service, each disconnect must be suitable for use as a service means [225.36].

In all applications other than the two identified in the exceptions to 225.37, a permanent plaque or directory at each feeder or branch disconnect location must show where all of the disconnects are.

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